“Per-Pound” Method: This Is How You Use it When Smoking

by Joost Nusselder | Last Updated:  May 27, 2022

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The per-pound method is a great way to ensure that your meat is cooked evenly and thoroughly. This method involves smoking the meat for a certain amount of time per pound.

It involves knowing the cooking time for a specific type of meat per pound, and knowing how many pounds you’re smoking.

For example, if your temperature is set to 225°F you need about 1 ½ hours of cook time per pound of brisket. This method is great for smoking most meat.

Brisket needs:

  • 1.5 to 2 hours per pound at 225 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 1 to 1.5 hours per pound at 250 degrees Fahrenheit
  • 45 minutes per pound at 300 degrees Fahrenheit

You can calculate to total smoking time as 18 hours for a 12-pound brisket at 225 degrees Fahrenheit, or around 12 hours for a 12-pound brisket at 250 degrees Fahrenheit.

However, this method can result in overcooked meat if you’re not careful. Make sure to keep an eye on your meat while it’s smoking, and use a meat thermometer to check the internal temperature of the meat before consuming it.

Remember, it’s just an estimate to get you started.

This method is especially useful if you are smoking large cuts of meat, like a pork shoulder or brisket. It is also a good way to cook multiple pieces of meat at the same time so you know when to start each to get them all done cooking at the same time.

To use the per pound method, simply determine how long you need to smoke the meat based on its weight. Then, set a timer for that amount of time and smoke the meat until it is cooked through.

You can use this method for any type of meat, but keep in mind that different cuts of meat will require different cook times. For example, a pork butt will take longer to smoke than a pork loin. Use your best judgment when smoking meat to ensure that it is cooked through and juicy.

Joost Nusselder, the founder of Lakeside Smokers is a content marketer, dad and loves trying out new food with BBQ Smoking (& Japanese food!) at the heart of his passion, and together with his team he's been creating in-depth blog articles since 2016 to help loyal readers with recipes and cooking tips.